1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + …. = -1/12

sum of all natural numbersWait a minute, what? That looks very very wrong. You must be wondering if the title is some horrendous typo, right? Well, let me assure you that it’s absolutely not! The sum of all natural numbers is equal to -1/12. This blog post is not just about mathematical trickery either. The equation in the title is actually a very important result used in theoretical physics, particularly in string theory. Now how can that be possible? Are physicists really that bad at mathematics? That can’t be it! What is the proof behind this? Do we ever encounter it in real life?   Continue reading

Quantum Encryption And Black Holes – Part 2/2

1 mainIn the previous post, we discussed about the concepts of quantum encryption and black holes. We also talked about how we do cryptography in the subatomic world. This blog post is a continuation of that discussion. As the title suggests, the overarching theme is the relationship between quantum encryption and black holes. Let’s continue talking about it then. Although quantum encryption looks extremely robust in theory, how practical is it? What do we know about its security and how is it related to black holes? We know that nothing can escape from black holes, so we need a way to understand more about the black holes.   Continue reading

Quantum Encryption And Black Holes – Part 1/2

1 mainIs that really the title? It looks like two random things mashed up together. Doesn’t make much sense, right? Well, recent research suggests that quantum encryption and black holes may be related. A proposed mathematical proof outlines the way in which information behaves in coded messages, and this may have implications for black holes. The proof basically suggests that the radiation spit out by black holes may retain information about them. The research not only focuses on encoding communications in quantum mechanical systems, but also addresses a long-standing question for theoretical physicists: What exactly happens to all the stuff that falls into a black hole? Is it possible to retrieve any information about the black hole?   Continue reading

Quantum Computing And Machine Learning

mainQuantum Computing refers to the use of quantum mechanical phenomena to make computations. This field is making big strides in the last decade because it can actually help us solve some of the most challenging problems in the realm of computer science, particularly in machine learning and security. Machine learning is all about building better models of the world to make more accurate predictions and security is about safeguarding the things we have built. For example, if we want the machines to see things better, we need better models of how we process visual data. If we want to understand currency fluctuations, we need better models of how they change over time. If we want to create effective environmental policies, we need better models of what’s happening to our climate. So how can we use quantum computing to do these things?   Continue reading

Quantum Computer

We are always hungry for more processing power. Whenever we buy computers, we always look for the ones with higher configuration. The computer manufacturers thrive to give us more speed and processing power at lower costs so that they can differentiate themselves from their competitors. With the emergence of so many technologies, our need for processing power is increasing by the day. Moore’s law states that the number of transistors on a microprocessor will double every 18 months. This law has been more or less true up until now but it is getting saturated. So we need to look into a different direction if we want to keep up. Quantum computers can perform calculations significantly faster than silicon-based computer. So what are quantum computers? How can they perform calculations so quickly?   Continue reading